Posts Tagged ‘LEADERSHIP’

Vital: Churches Changing Communities and the World

 

Jorge Acevedo

 

Lead Pastor ~ Grace Church in Southwest Florida

 

A Seminar for Laity and Clergy

 

Thursday, November 14, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

Mt. Comfort United Methodist Church

3179 North 600 West (Mt. Comfort Rd) ~ Greenfield, IN 46140 ~ 317.894.8965

1/2 mile north of I-70 (Exit 96) on Mt. Comfort Road (600W) 

 

Jorge Acevedo

Jorge Acevedo

Have you heard of Jorge Acevedo? His multi-cultural, multi-site, mega-church in southwest Florida has done what the United Methodist Church has struggled to do: reach people. His book, Vital, was a suggested text before the 2012 General Conference, and is a pretty good read.

In just a couple of weeks, he’ll be coming to Indiana to lead a day-long seminar you don’t want to miss! The location is Mt. Comfort UMC, which is near Indianapolis.

The event is sponsored by the Indiana Conference Confessing Movement. For details and registration information, click here.

 

There are a lot of challenging things happening in the UMC right now; but there remains one thing I believe we can still all agree on – the importance of reaching out to others with the love of Jesus Christ. That’s exactly what Jorge Acevedo is doing in Southwest Florida. If you’re anywhere close, I hope you’ll make an effort to attend.

 

Kim Reisman

Kim Reisman

 

Next Step was founded in 2005 as a vehicle for ministry in the areas of evangelism, spiritual formation, and leadership development. It’s been an amazing 8 years, full of challenges, surprises, and a great deal of meaning. Many of you have been with me from the beginning, some have come alongside me more recently, all of you have been wonderfully supportive.

Opportunities are currently unfolding that will necessitate a change in direction for Next Step. I’m shifting responsibility and will now be at the forefront of a new venture – A Wesleyan Accent – a web-based ministry providing free and subscription resources for Christian spiritual formation, catechesis, and discipleship in the Wesleyan way. It’s my hope that by clearly articulating the Wesleyan understanding of Christian faith, A Wesleyan Accent will contribute significantly to the task of strengthening discipleship, empowering mission and evangelism, cultivating ministry gifts of young leaders, and nurturing the professional and service life of young theologians.

There will be two main areas of the WesleyanAccent.com site – free resources and information, and subscription resources. The free resources will include blogs, sermons, articles, book reviews, and videos from leading voices in the Wesleyan family. Discipleship in the Wesleyan Way will be the subscription portion the site. Individuals and churches will be able to purchase annual subscriptions, which will provide access to an extensive library of small group lessons on all aspects of Christian theology. Additionally, Discipleship in the Wesleyan Way will support discipleship and small group development by providing resources for both leaders and participants through a platform of customizable curriculum planning and private group portals for ongoing communication and additional resourcing.

I’m excited about this new phase of ministry. A Wesleyan Accent will launch in the fall and you’ll be able to find us at www.wesleyanaccent.com. At that time, visitors to this site will be redirected to A Wesleyan Accent. In the meantime, if you’re new to Next Step, I hope you’ll explore the site as it is – there’s a lot of great content here that will remain accessible to you throughout the transition phase and beyond.

Thanks again for your support. I look forward to continuing to serve through A Wesleyan Accent!

Peace,

Kim

 

Paul Chilcote

Why have United Methodists been so passionate about mission? What is it that propels them to offer Christ in holistic ways? And yet, what are the tensions the United Methodist Church currently faces in becoming a global church and in facing new challenges in North America?

Join Paul Chilcote, Professor of Wesley Studies and Mission at Ashland Theological Seminary and a member of the Indiana Conference, as he leads this engaging seminar on Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition and the transitions the church will need to navigate in the years ahead.

 

Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition: Tensions & Transitions

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

9am ~ 3pm

$45.00 (lunch included)

North United Methodist Church ~ 3808 N. Meridian St. ~ Indianapolis, IN 46208

This seminar is organized by the Wesleyan Connexion Project of the Indiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. It’s a great opportunity for all clergy and laity interested in mission.
Click here to register

 

 

Wesley statueWhy have United Methodists been so passionate about mission? What is it that propels them to offer Christ in holistic ways? And yet, what are the tensions the United Methodist Church currently faces in becoming a global church and in facing new challenges in North America?

Join Paul Chilcote, Professor of Wesley Studies and Mission at Ashland Theological Seminary and a member of the Indiana Conference, as he leads this engaging seminar on Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition and the transitions the church will need to navigate in the years ahead.

Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition: Tensions & Transitions

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

9am ~ 3pm

$45.00 (lunch included)

North United Methodist Church ~ 3808 N. Meridian St. ~ Indianapolis, IN 46208

This seminar is organized by the Wesleyan Connexion Project of the Indiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. It’s a great opportunity for all clergy and laity interested in mission.
Click here to register

 

 

 

Register Now for LCI 2013!

 

Calling all clergy, church staff and lay leaders! Ready to set your congregation on fire for God? Register now for “Ignite: Growing Disciples to Transform the World,” the 2013 Large Church Initiative of the United Methodist Church.

LCI 2013 will feature more than 50 workshops on growing disciples focused on:

    • Stewardship
    • Congregational Care
    • Education
    • Children
    • Youth
    • Serving
    • Worship
    • Communications

 … and more.

 

Hosted by Hyde Park United Methodist Church in Tampa, FL

April 22-24

 

Early bird registration rates and workshop selections are now available!

Registration Fee

On or Before Feb. 1, 2013 – Early Bird Rate

$299 individual

$279 group (four or more people)

After Feb. 1, 2013

$349 individual

$329 group (four or more people)

 Register online at www.lci2013.com

 

Paul Chilcote

Paul Chilcote

Why have United Methodists been so passionate about mission? What is it that propels them to offer Christ in holistic ways? And yet, what are the tensions the United Methodist Church currently faces in becoming a global church and in facing new challenges in North America?

Join Paul Chilcote, Professor of Wesley Studies and Mission at Ashland Theological Seminary and a member of the Indiana Conference, as he leads this engaging seminar on Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition and the transitions the church will need to navigate in the years ahead.

 

Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition: Tensions & Transitions

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

9am ~ 3pm

$45.00 (lunch included)

North United Methodist Church ~ 3808 N. Meridian St. ~ Indianapolis, IN 46208

This seminar is organized by the Wesleyan Connexion Project of the Indiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. It’s a great opportunity for all clergy and laity interested in mission.
Click here to register

 

 

MLM-splash-3

Making Life Matter

 

Making Life Matter is a weekly 30 minute Christian inspirational and teaching program hosted by Maxie Dunnam and Shane Stanford. Next Step partners with Kingdom Catalysts to bring you MLM, which tackles issues of faith and life to deepen discipleship and encourage strong connections between following Jesus and living in today’s world. Mark your calendars to visit Next Step and listen regularly. Click below to hear today’s program.

 

Kim Reisman

Kim Reisman

What’s your next step?

It’s a good question – in this case as it relates to the United Methodist Church – what’s our next step? General Conference is a (sort of) distant memory; our regional Jurisdictional Conferences have come and gone. Various groups and people have publically staked out their claims about keeping their covenants or breaking them. So what’s next?

Jason Vickers

Jason Vickers

Now that my PhD work is officially over I’ve begun trying to catch up on my reading. Jason Vickers’ book, Minding the Good Ground: A Theology of Church Renewal was a timely read in the aftermath of all the church politics that have unfolded thus far in 2012. The book is full of important insights that are particularly relevant to the current state of affairs in the UMC. I hope to explore some of those insights over the next several posts.

The first idea I want to highlight comes at the very end of the book – literally the next to last page. Jason writes:

…Many liberals and evangelicals are blinded to the shifts taking place around them precisely because they cannot take their eyes off one another long enough to take notice. It is as though evangelical and liberal Protestants are locked in a death embrace in which both sides are equally obsessed with killing one another. All the while, we keep buried in our basements the solid food for which a spiritually hungry generation is searching far and wide.*

I’m not sure I’ve read a better description of General Conference 2012. But more than that – Jason is spot on in his insight when it comes to the overall UMC. That’s what troubles me. How can we really understand the nature of the church, of what God has called us to be and do in the world, if we are so distracted?

Many folks these days talk about reviving the ‘movement’ nature of Methodism as a way of renewing the UMC. I find that somewhat ironic since in its institutionalism, the UM of today resembles the Church of England of John Wesley’s day. Being or behaving like a movement seems unlikely. A better option might be Wesley’s own approach of seeking ‘the lost sheep of United Methodism.’**

For that to happen though, we’ve got to take our eyes off each other long enough to recognize the presence of the Holy Spirit, on whom the very life of the church depends.

 

*Jason Vickers, Minding the Good Ground: A Theology for Church Renewal (Waco: Baylor University Press, 2011), 106

**In Reasons Against a Separation from the Church of England, Wesley described his work as being for ‘the lost sheep of the Church of England.’

 

Wesley statueWhy have United Methodists been so passionate about mission? What is it that propels them to offer Christ in holistic ways? And yet, what are the tensions the United Methodist Church currently faces in becoming a global church and in facing new challenges in North America?

Join Paul Chilcote, Professor of Wesley Studies and Mission at Ashland Theological Seminary and a member of the Indiana Conference, as he leads this engaging seminar on Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition and the transitions the church will need to navigate in the years ahead.

Mission in the Wesleyan Tradition: Tensions & Transitions

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

9am ~ 3pm

$45.00 (lunch included)

North United Methodist Church ~ 3808 N. Meridian St. ~ Indianapolis, IN 46208

This seminar is organized by the Wesleyan Connexion Project of the Indiana Conference of the United Methodist Church. It’s a great opportunity for all clergy and laity interested in mission.
Click here to register

 

“Leaving a Legacy” – July 17, 2012

I Chronicles 22 tells how King David began stockpiling materials for the building of the Temple in Jerusalem. David had been told by God that he would not be the one who would build a temple for the Lord, because of David’s many sins and many killings in war. Rather than pout about that fact, David put his energy into stockpiling materials in hopes that his son Solomon could build the beautiful Temple which was indeed accomplished under Solomon’s reign.

David understand the important of leaving a legacy. He understood that each generation should stockpile resources for the next generation. He accepted that his own failures and inadequacies would prevent him from accomplishing everything he wanted to do during his own lifetime, but he used that fact as a motivation for the future success of those who would come after him.

Perhaps ministry today in the church is not just about the NOW but is also about the NEXT. Perhaps church leaders should always be stockpiling resources (financial resources, new leadership development, strong traditions) in order to help the next generation to fulfill its own ministry.

I am finding that more and more churches and pastors are wanting to develop “succession plans” for their future. Veteran pastors want to see their churches thrive beyond their own retirement, so they are thinking ahead about how best to provide their churches with the next leaders. I applaud such thinking, but I know it takes a great deal of humility and maturity to admit that our current leadership may not accomplish everything. Accepting our own limitations, including the limitation of time, can lead us to do what King David did – to stockpile resources for the future and to leave a legacy of faithfulness.

May it be so in all of our lives and ministries.

Mike Coyner

Bishop Michael Coyner